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Nevada ( or , Spanish: [neˈβaða]) is a state in the Western United States. It is bordered by Oregon to the northwest, Idaho to the northeast, California to the west, Arizona to the southeast, and Utah to the east. Nevada is the 7th most extensive, the 32nd most populous, but the 9th least densely populated of the U.S. states. Nearly three-quarters of Nevada's people live in Clark County, which contains the Las Vegas–Paradise metropolitan area, including three of the state's four largest incorporated cities. Nevada's capital is Carson City.

Nevada is officially known as the "Silver State" because of the importance of silver to its history and economy. It is also known as the "Battle Born State" because it achieved statehood during the Civil War (the words "Battle Born" also appear on the state flag); as the "Sagebrush State", for the native plant of the same name; and as the "Sage-hen State".

Nevada is largely desert and semi-arid, much of it within the Great Basin. Areas south of the Great Basin are within the Mojave Desert, while Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada lie on the western edge. About 86% of the state's land is managed by various jurisdictions of the U.S. federal government, both civilian and military.

Before European contact — and still today, American Indians of the Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe tribes inhabited the land that is now Nevada. The first Europeans to explore the region were Spanish. They called the region Nevada (snowy) because of the snow which covered the mountains in winter. The area formed part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, and became part of Mexico when it gained independence in 1821. The United States annexed the area in 1848 after its victory in the Mexican–American War, and it was incorporated as part of Utah Territory in 1850. The discovery of silver at the Comstock Lode in 1859 led to a population boom that became an impetus to the creation of Nevada Territory out of western Utah Territory in 1861. Nevada became the 36th state on October 31, 1864, as the second of two states added to the Union during the Civil War (the first being West Virginia).

Nevada has a reputation for its libertarian laws. In 1940, with a population of just over 110,000 people, Nevada was by far the least-populated state, with less than half the population of the next least-populated state. However, legalized gambling and lenient marriage and divorce laws transformed Nevada into a major tourist destination in the 20th century. Nevada is the only U.S. state where prostitution is legal, though it is illegal in its most populated regions — Clark County (Las Vegas), Washoe County (Reno) and Carson City (which, as an independent city, is not within the boundaries of any county). The tourism industry remains Nevada's largest employer, with mining continuing as a substantial sector of the economy: Nevada is the fourth-largest producer of gold in the world.

</ref><ref name = USGS>

</ref><ref name=NAVD88>Elevation adjusted to North American Vertical Datum of 1988.</ref>

, which falls under the often used

cutoff for an independent peak. Also, Boundary Peak is less than

away from its higher neighbor. Hence Boundary Peak can be described as not being wholly within Nevada. By contrast, the prominence of Wheeler Peak,

, is quite large and in fact it is the twelfth largest in the contiguous United States. Wheeler Peak is the highest point in a radius of more than

and is entirely within the state of Nevada.}}

Nevada is a state in the western, mountain west, and southwestern regions of the United States. Nevada is the 7th most extensive, the 35th most populous, and the 9th least densely populated of the 50 United States. Nearly three-quarters of Nevada's people live in Clark County, which contains the Las Vegas–Paradise metropolitan area<ref>

</ref> where the state's three largest incorporated cities are located.<ref>

</ref> Nevada's capital is Carson City. Nevada is officially known as the “Silver State” due to the importance of silver to its history and economy. It is also known as the “Battle Born State”, because it achieved statehood during the Civil War; “Sagebrush State”, for the native eponymous plant; and “Sage hen State.”<ref>

</ref>

Nevada is largely desert and semiarid, with much of it located within the Great Basin. Areas south of the Great Basin are located within the Mojave Desert, while Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada lie on the western edge. Approximately 86% of the state's land is owned by various jurisdictions of the U.S. federal government, both civilian and military.<ref>

</ref>

The name Nevada is derived from the nearby Sierra Nevada, which means “snow-capped range” in Spanish. The land comprising the modern state was inhabited by Native Americans of the Paiute, Shoshone, and Washoe tribes prior to European contact. It was subsequently claimed by Spain as a part of Alta California until the Mexican War of Independence brought it under Mexican control. The United States gained the territory in 1848 following its victory in the Mexican-American War, and the area was eventually incorporated as part of Utah Territory in 1850. The discovery of silver at the Comstock Lode in 1859 led to a population boom that was an impetus to the creation of Nevada Territory out of western Utah Territory in 1861. Nevada became the 36th state on October 31, 1864, as the second of two states added to the Union during the Civil War (the first being West Virginia).<ref>Rocha, Guy "Myth No. 12 – Why Did Nevada Become a State?", “Nevada State Library and Archives”, accessed January 9, 2011</ref>

Nevada is known for its libertarian laws. The establishment of legalized gambling and lenient marriage and divorce proceedings in the 20th century transformed Nevada into a major tourist destination.<ref>Bible, Bill "Protect Gaming's Legacy", “Las Vegas Sun”, August 11, 2000, accessed January 9, 2011</ref><ref>Jain, Priya "Betty Goes Reno", “Slate”, July 21, 2010, accessed January 9, 2011</ref> Nevada is the only state in the U.S. where prostitution is legal (though prostitution is illegal in Clark County and Washoe County, which contain Las Vegas and Reno, respectively). The tourism industry remains Nevada's largest employer,<ref>"Nevada Employment & Unemployment Estimates for November 2010", “Nevada Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation”</ref> with mining continuing to be a substantial sector of the economy as Nevada is the fourth largest producer of gold in the world.<ref>"Frequently Asked Questions", Nevada Mining Association, accessed January 7, 2011</ref>

Etymology and pronunciation

, the highest peak entirely within Nevada]]

The name “Nevada” comes from the Spanish nevada

, meaning “snow-covered”,<ref>

</ref> after the Sierra Nevadas (“snow-covered mountain range”).

Nevadans normally pronounce the second syllable of their state name using the

vowel of “bad”. Many from outside the Western United States pronounce it with the

vowel of “father”

. Although the latter pronunciation is closer to the Spanish pronunciation, it is not the pronunciation preferred by locals. Notably, George W. Bush made this faux pas during his campaign for the 2004 U.S. Presidential Election. Vindication later came when President Bush campaigned at the Reno-Sparks Convention Center on June 18, 2004. The president opened his talk by proclaiming that “It's great to be here in Nevada

,” emphasizing the correct “A” – the crowd roared its approval when he light-heartedly noted, “You didn't think I'd get it right, did ya?”<ref>

</ref> Bush subsequently carried the state in the election. Assemblyman Harry Mortenson has proposed a bill to recognize the alternate (quasi-Spanish) pronunciation of Nevada,<ref>

</ref> though the bill was not supported by most legislators and never received a vote.

Geography

]]

]]

.]]

.]] Nevada is almost entirely within the Basin and Range Province, and is broken up by many north-south mountain ranges. Most of these ranges have endorheic valleys between them, which belies the image portrayed by the term Great Basin.

Much of the northern part of the state is within the Great Basin, a mild desert that experiences hot temperatures in the summer and cold temperatures in the winter. Occasionally, moisture from the Arizona Monsoon will cause summer thunderstorms; Pacific storms may blanket the area with snow. The state's highest recorded temperature was

in Laughlin (elevation of

) on June 29, 1994.<ref name=“ReferenceA”>National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, N.C., and Storm Phillips, Stormfax, Inc.</ref> The coldest recorded temperature was

set in San Jacinto in 1972, in the northeastern portion of the state.<ref name=“ReferenceA”/>

The Humboldt River crosses the state from east to west across the northern part of the state, draining into the Humboldt Sink near Lovelock. Several rivers drain from the Sierra Nevada eastward, including the Walker, Truckee, and Carson rivers.

The mountain ranges, some of which have peaks above

, harbor lush forests high above desert plains, creating sky islands for endemic species. The valleys are often no lower in elevation than

.

The southern third of the state, where the Las Vegas area is situated, is within the Mojave Desert. The area receives less rain in the winter but is closer to the Arizona Monsoon in the summer. The terrain is also lower, mostly below

, creating conditions for hot summer days and cool to chilly winter nights (due to temperature inversion).

Nevada and California have by far the longest diagonal line (in respect to the cardinal directions) as a state boundary at just over

. This line begins in Lake Tahoe nearly

offshore (in the direction of the boundary), and continues to the Colorado River where the Nevada, California, and Arizona boundaries merge

southwest of the Laughlin Bridge.

The largest mountain range in the southern portion of the state is the Spring Mountain Range, just west of Las Vegas. The state's lowest point is along the Colorado River, south of Laughlin.

Nevada has 172 mountain summits with

of prominence. Nevada ranks second in the US, behind Alaska, and ahead of California, Montana, and Washington. This makes Nevada the “Most Mountainous” state in the country, at least by this measure.

Climate

Nevada is the driest state in the United States.<ref>

</ref> It is made up of mostly desert and semiarid climate regions, daytime summer temperatures sometimes may rise as high as

and nighttime winter temperatures may reach as low as

. While winters in northern Nevada are long and fairly cold, the winter season in the southern part of the state tends to be of short duration and mild. Most parts of Nevada receive scarce precipitation during the year. Most rain that falls in the state falls on the lee side (east and northeast slopes) of the Sierra Nevada.

The average annual rainfall per year is about

; the wettest parts get around

. Nevada's highest recorded temperature is

at Laughlin on June 29, 1994 and the lowest recorded temperature is

at San Jacinto on January 8, 1937. Nevada's

reading is the third highest temperature recorded in the U.S. just behind Arizona's

reading and California's

reading.

Vegetation

The vegetation of Nevada is diverse and differs by state area. Nevada contains six biotic zones: alpine, sub-alpine, “Ponderosa Pine”, “pinion-juniper”, “sagebrush” and “creosotebush”.<ref>

</ref>

Counties

. The majority of Nevada's population lives in Clark county.]] Nevada is divided into political jurisdictions designated as counties. Carson City is officially a consolidated municipality; however, for many purposes under state law it is considered to be a county. As of 1919 there were 17 counties in the state, ranging from

.

Lake County, one of the original nine counties formed in 1861, was renamed Roop County in 1862. Part of the county became Lassen County, California in 1864. The portion that remained in Nevada was annexed in 1883 by Washoe County.<ref name=“library”>

</ref>

In 1970 Ormsby County was dissolved and the Consolidated Municipality of Carson City was created by the Legislature in its place co-terminous with the old boundaries of Ormsby County.

Bullfrog County, was formed in 1987 from part of Nye County. After the creation was declared unconstitutional the county was abolished in 1989.<ref name=“library” />

Humboldt county was designated as a county in 1856 by Utah Territorial Legislature and again in 1861 by the new Nevada Legislature.

Clark County is the most populous county in Nevada, accounting for nearly three-quarters of its residents. Las Vegas, Nevada's most populous city, has been the county seat since the county was created. Clark County attracts numerous tourists. An estimated 40 million people have visited Clark County in 2009.<ref>http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/visitors/Pages/default.aspx</ref>

Washoe County is the second most populous county of Nevada. Its county seat is Reno. Washoe County includes the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area.

Nevada Counties
County name County seat Year founded 2010 population <ref>

</ref>

Percent of total Area (mi²) Percent of total Population density (/mi²)
Carson City Carson City 1861 55,274 2.63 % 146 0.13 % 359.29
Churchill Fallon 1861 24,877 1.20 % 5,023 4.54 % 4.77
Clark Las Vegas 1908 1,951,269 68.85 % 8,091 7.32 % 170.04
Douglas Minden 1861 46,997 2.06 % 738 0.67 % 55.91
Elko Elko 1869 48,818 2.27 % 17,203 15.56 % 2.63
Esmeralda Goldfield 1861 783 0.05 % 3,589 3.25 % 0.27
Eureka Eureka 1869 1,987 0.08 % 4,180 3.78 % 0.39
Humboldt Winnemucca 1856/1861 16,528 0.81 % 9,658 8.74 % 1.67
Lander Battle Mountain 1861 5,775 0.29 % 5,519 4.99 % 1.05
Lincoln Pioche 1866 5,345 0.21 % 10,637 9.62 % 0.39
Lyon Yerington 1861 51,980 1.73 % 2,016 1.82 % 17.11
Mineral Hawthorne 1911 4,772 0.25 % 3,813 3.45 % 1.33
Nye Tonopah 1864 43,946 1.63 % 18,159 16.43 % 1.79
Pershing Lovelock 1919 6,753 0.33 % 6,068 5.49 % 1.10
Storey Virginia City 1861 4,010 0.17 % 264 0.24 % 12.88
Washoe Reno 1861 421,407 16.99 % 6,551 5.93 % 51.82
White Pine Ely 1869 10,030 0.46 % 8,897 8.05 % 1.03
Totals Counties: 17 2,700,551 110,552 18.08

==History==<!– This section is linked from List of capitals in the United States –>

Before 1861

See History of Utah, History of Las Vegas, and the discovery of the first major U.S. deposit of silver ore in Comstock Lode under Virginia City, Nevada in 1859.

Separation from Utah Territory

File:Nevada Territory in 1861.svg

On March 2, 1861, the Nevada Territory separated from the Utah Territory and adopted its current name, shortened from Sierra Nevada (Spanish for “snow-covered mountain range”).

The 1861 southern boundary is commemorated by Nevada Historical Markers 57 and 58 in Lincoln and Nye counties.

Statehood (1864)

Eight days prior to the presidential election of 1864, Nevada became the 36th state in the union. Statehood was rushed to the date of October 31 to help ensure Abraham Lincoln's reelection on November 8 and post-Civil War Republican dominance in Congress,<ref>Rocha Guy, ''Historical Myth a Month: Why Did Nevada Become A State?''

</ref> as Nevada's mining-based economy tied it to the more industrialized Union. As it turned out, however, Lincoln and the Republicans won the election handily, and did not need Nevada's help.

Nevada is notable for being one of only two states to significantly expand its borders after admission to the Union. (The other is Missouri, which acquired additional territory in 1837 due to the Platte Purchase.) Nevada achieved its current southern boundaries on May 5, 1866, when it absorbed the portion of Pah-Ute County in the Arizona Territory west of the Colorado River, essentially all of present day Nevada south of the 37th parallel.

The transfer was prompted by the discovery of gold in the area, and it was thought by officials that Nevada would be better able to oversee the expected population boom. This area includes most of what is now Clark County. In 1868 another part of the western Utah Territory, whose population was seeking to avoid Mormon dominance, was added to Nevada in the eastern part of the state, setting the current eastern boundary.

Mining shaped Nevada's economy for many years (see Silver mining in Nevada). When Mark Twain lived in Nevada during the period described in Roughing It, mining had led to an industry of speculation and immense wealth. However, both mining and population declined in the late 19th century. However, the rich silver strike at Tonopah in 1900, followed by strikes in Goldfield and Rhyolite, again put Nevada's population on an upward trend.

Gambling and labor

Unregulated gambling was commonplace in the early Nevada mining towns but was outlawed in 1909 as part of a nation-wide anti-gambling crusade. Because of subsequent declines in mining output and the decline of the agricultural sector during the Great Depression, Nevada again legalized gambling on March 19, 1931, with approval from the legislature. Governor Fred B. Balzar's signature enacted the most liberal divorce laws in the country and open gambling. The reforms came just eight days after the federal government presented the $49 million construction contract for Boulder Dam (now Hoover Dam).<ref>Moe, Al W. Nevada's Golden Age of Gambling, Puget Sound Books, 2002, p.18</ref>

Nuclear testing

The Nevada Test Site,

northwest of the city of Las Vegas, was founded on January 11, 1951, for the testing of nuclear weapons. The site is composed of approximately

of desert and mountainous terrain. Nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site began with a

bomb dropped on Frenchman Flat on January 27, 1951. The last atmospheric test was conducted on July 17, 1962, and the underground testing of weapons continued until September 23, 1992. The location is known for having the highest concentration of nuclear-detonated weapons in the U.S.

Over 80% of the state's area is owned by the federal government. The primary reason for this is that homesteads were not permitted in large enough sizes to be viable in the arid conditions that prevail throughout desert Nevada. Instead, early settlers would homestead land surrounding a water source, and then graze livestock on the adjacent public land, which is useless for agriculture without access to water (this pattern of ranching still prevails).

Demographics

Population

The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Nevada was 2,790,136 on July 1, 2013, a 3.3% increase since the 2010 United States Census.<ref name=“PopEstUS”>

</ref>

According to the Census Bureau's 2012 estimate, Nevada has an estimated population of 2,758,931 which is an increase of 38,903, or 1.4%, from the prior year and an increase of 58,379, or 2.2%, since the year 2010. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 81,661 people (that is 170,451 births minus 88,790 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 337,043 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 66,098 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 270,945 people. According to the 2006 census estimate, Nevada is the eighth fastest growing state in the nation.<ref>

</ref>

The center of population of Nevada is located in southern Nye County.<ref>

</ref> In this county, the unincorporated town of Pahrump, located

west of Las Vegas on the California state line, has grown very rapidly from 1980 to 2010. At the 2010 census, the town had 36,441 residents.<ref>

</ref> Las Vegas was America's fastest-growing city and metropolitan area from 1960 to 2000, but has grown from a gulch of 100 people in 1900 to 10,000 by 1950 to 100,000 by 1970.

From about the 1940s until 2003, Nevada was the fastest-growing state in the US percentage-wise. Between 1990 and 2000, Nevada's population increased 66.3%, while the USA's population increased 13.1%. Over two thirds of the population of the state live in the Clark County Las Vegas metropolitan area.

Henderson and North Las Vegas are among the USA's top 20 fastest-growing cities of over 100,000.

The rural community of Mesquite located

northeast of Las Vegas was an example of micropolitan growth in the 1990s and 2000s. Other desert towns like Indian Springs and Searchlight on the outskirts of Las Vegas have seen some growth as well.

Large numbers of new residents in the state originate from California, which led some locals to feel that their state is being “Californicated”.<ref>

</ref>

Largest Cities

located largely in Paradise]]

]]

]]

]]

]]

]]

]]

]]

]]

Top 10 locations by GDP in Nevada

Ranked by per capita income in 2000
Rank Place GDP County
1 Incline Village-Crystal Bay $52,521 Washoe
2 Kingsbury $41,421 Douglas
3 Mount Charleston $38,821 Clark
4 Verdi-Mogul $38,233 Washoe
5 Zephyr Cove-Round Hill Village $37,218 Douglas
6 Summerlin South $33,017 Clark
7 Blue Diamond $30,479 Clark
8 Minden $30,405 Douglas
9 Boulder City $29,770 Clark
10 Spanish Springs $26,908 Washoe

Rural areas

A small percentage of Nevada's population lives in rural areas. The culture of these places differs significantly from that of the major metropolitan areas. People in these rural counties tend to be native Nevada residents, unlike in the Las Vegas and Reno areas, where the vast majority of the population was born in another state. The rural population is also less diverse in terms of race and ethnicity. Mining plays an important role in the economies of the rural counties, with tourism being less prominent.<ref>

</ref>

Races

According to the 2010 census estimates, racial distribution was as follows:

Hispanics or Latinos of any race made 26.5% of the population.<ref name=“quickfacts.census.gov”>

</ref> In 1970, non-Hispanic whites made up 88% of the state's population.<ref>

</ref>

Nevada Racial Breakdown of Population
Racial composition 1990<ref>Historical Census Statistics on Population Totals By Race, 1790 to 1990, and By Hispanic Origin, 1970 to 1990, For The United States, Regions, Divisions, and States</ref> 2000<ref>Population of Nevada: Census 2010 and 2000 Interactive Map, Demographics, Statistics, Quick Facts</ref> 2010<ref>2010 Census Data</ref>
White 84.3% 75.2% 66.2%
Black 6.6% 6.8% 8.1%
Asian 3.2% 4.5% 7.2%
Native 1.6% 1.3% 1.2%
Native Hawaiian and <br>other Pacific Islander - 0.4% 0.6%
Other race 4.4% 8.0% 12.0%
Two or more races - 3.8% 4.7%

The principal ancestries of Nevada's residents in 2009 have been surveyed to be the following:<ref>Nevada – Selected Social Characteristics in the United States, 2009 American Community Survey 1-year Estimates, U.S. Census Bureau, 2009. Retrieved November 2, 2011.</ref>

Nevada is home to many cultures and nationalities. As of 2011, 63.6% of Nevada's population younger than age 1 were minorities.<ref>“Americans under age 1 now mostly minorities, but not in Ohio: Statistical Snapshot”. The Plain Dealer. June 3, 2012.</ref> Las Vegas is minority majority city . Nevada also has a sizable Basque ancestry population. In Douglas, Mineral and Pershing counties, a plurality of residents are of Mexican ancestry, with Clark County (Las Vegas) alone being home to over 200,000 Mexican Americans. Nye County and Humboldt County have a plurality of Germans; and Washoe County has many Irish Americans. Americans of English descent form pluralities in Lincoln County, Churchill County, Lyon County, White Pine County and Eureka County. Las Vegas is home to rapid-growing ethnic communities, including Scandinavians, Italians, Poles, Greeks, Spaniards and Armenians.

Largely African American sections of Las Vegas (“the Meadows”) and Reno can be found. Many current African-American Nevadans are newly transplanted residents from California.

Asian Americans lived in the state since the California Gold Rush of the 1850s brought thousands of Chinese miners to Washoe county. They were followed by a few hundred Japanese farm workers in the late 19th century. By the late 20th century, many immigrants from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines and recently from India and Vietnam came to the Las Vegas metropolitan area. The city now has one of America's most prolific Asian American communities, with a mostly Chinese and Taiwanese area known as “Chinatown” west of I-15 on Spring Mountain Boulevard, and an “Asiatown” shopping mall for Asian customers located at Charleston Avenue and Paradise Boulevard. Filipino Americans form the largest Asian American group in the state, with a population of more than 113,000. They comprise 56.5% of the Asian American population in Nevada and constitute about 4.3% of the entire state's population.<ref>

</ref>

According to the 2000 US Census, 16.19% of Nevada's population aged 5 and older speak Spanish at home, while 1.59% speak Filipino,<ref>

</ref> and 1% speak Chinese languages.

At the 2010 census, 6.9% of the state's population were reported as under 5, 24.6% were under 18, and 12.0% were 65 or older.<ref name=“quickfacts.census.gov”/> Females made up approximately 49.5% of the population.<ref name=“quickfacts.census.gov”/>

Las Vegas was a major destination for immigrants from South Asia and Latin America seeking employment in the gaming and hospitality industries during the 1990s and first decade of the 21st century, but farming and construction are the biggest employers of immigrant labor.

Senior citizens (over age 65) and young children or teenagers (under age 18) form large sections of the Nevada population. The religious makeup of Nevadans includes large communities of Mormons, Roman Catholics and Evangelicals; each is known for higher birth rates and a younger than national average age. American Jews represent a large proportion of the active adult retirement community.

Data from 2000 and 2005 suggests the following figures:

</ref> }}

In 2010, illegal immigrants constituted an estimated 8.8% of the population. This was the highest percentage of any state in the country.<ref>

</ref><!—as often happens, the box score figures listed in Wikipedia article are from print edition and did not appear in the online article—>

Religion

Church attendance in Nevada is among the lowest of all US states. In a 2009 Gallup poll only 30% of Nevadans said they attended church weekly or almost weekly, compared to 42% of all Americans (only four states were found to have a lower attendance rate than Nevada).<ref>http://www.gallup.com/poll/125999/mississippians-go-church-most-vermonters-least.aspx</ref>

Major religious affiliations of the people of Nevada are:<ref>

</ref> Roman Catholic 27%, Protestant 26%, Latter-day Saint/ Mormon 11%, Muslim 2%, Jewish 1%, Hindu 1%, and Buddhist 0.5%. The unaffiliated are at 20%.

The largest denominations by number of adherents in 2010 were the Roman Catholic Church with 451,070; The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with 175,149; and the Southern Baptist Convention with 45,535; Buddhist congregations 14,727; Bahá'í 1,723; and Muslim 1,700.<ref name=“www.thearda.com”>

</ref>

Economy

, with sign promoting it as The City of Entertainment]]

near the Bruneau River in Elko County, Nevada]]

, the largest Carlin-type deposit in the world, containing more than

gold.<ref>Western Region Gold Deposits at USGS</ref>]] The economy of Nevada has long been tied to vice industries. “[Nevada was] founded on mining and refounded on sin—-beginning with prizefighting and easy divorce a century ago and later extending to gaming and prostitution”, said the August 21, 2010 issue of The Economist.<ref>The Economist, August 21, 2010, p. 35</ref>

The Bureau of Economic Analysis<ref>

</ref><ref>

</ref> estimates that Nevada's total state product in 2010 was $126&nbsp;billion. Resort areas like Las Vegas, Reno, Lake Tahoe, and Laughlin attract visitors from around the nation and world. In FY08 the total of 266 casinos with gaming revenue over $1m for the year, brought in revenue of $12&nbsp;billion in gaming revenue, and $13&nbsp;billion in non-gaming revenue. A review of gaming statistics can be found at Nevada gaming area.

The state's Per capita personal income in 2009 was $38,578, ranking nineteenth in the nation.<ref>

</ref>

As of August 2011, the state's unemployment rate is the worst in the nation at 13.4%.<ref>

</ref>

Its agricultural outputs are cattle, hay, alfalfa, dairy products, onions, and potatoes. Its industrial outputs are tourism, mining, machinery, printing and publishing, food processing, and electric equipment.

In portions of the state outside of the Las Vegas and Reno metropolitan areas, mining and cattle ranching are the major economic activities. By value, gold is by far the most important mineral mined. In 2004,

of gold worth $2.84&nbsp;billion were mined in Nevada, and the state accounted for 8.7% of world gold production (see Gold mining in Nevada). Silver is a distant second, with

worth $69&nbsp;million mined in 2004 (see Silver mining in Nevada).<ref>Nevada Mining Association, ''Economic Overview of the Nevada Mining Industry 2004''

</ref> Other minerals mined in Nevada include construction aggregates, copper, gypsum, diatomite and lithium. Despite its rich deposits, the cost of mining in Nevada is generally high, and output is very sensitive to world commodity prices.

As of January 1, 2006, there were an estimated 500,000 head of cattle and 70,000 head of sheep in Nevada.<ref>United States Department of Agriculture Nevada State Agriculture Overview – 2005</ref> Most of these animals forage on rangeland in the summer, with supplemental feed in the winter. Calves are generally shipped to out-of-state feedlots in the fall to be fattened for market. Over 90% of Nevada's

of cropland is used to grow hay, mostly alfalfa, for livestock feed.

Nevada has by far the most hotel rooms per capita in the United States. According to the American Hotel and Lodging Association, there were 187,301 rooms in 584 hotels (of 15 or more rooms). The state is ranked just below California, Texas, Florida, and New York in total number of rooms, but those states have much larger populations. Nevada has one hotel room for every 14 residents, far above the national average of one hotel room per 67 residents.<ref>

</ref>

Prostitution is legal in parts of Nevada in licensed brothels, but only counties with populations under 400,000 residents have the option to legalize it. Although prostitution employs roughly 300 women as independent contractors, and not a major part of the Nevada economy, it is a very visible endeavor. Of the 14 counties that are permitted to legalize prostitution under state law, 8 have chosen to legalize brothels. State law prohibits prostitution in Clark County (which contains Las Vegas), and Washoe County (which contains Reno). However, prostitution is legal in Storey County, which is part of the Reno–Sparks metropolitan area.

Taxation

The state sales tax in Nevada is variable depending upon the county. The minimum statewide tax rate is 6.85%, with five counties (Elko, Esmeralda, Eureka, Humboldt, and Mineral) charging this minimum amount. All other counties assess various option taxes, making the combined state/county sales taxes rate in one county as high as 8.1%, which is the amount charged in Clark County. Sales tax in the other major counties: Carson at 7.745%, Washoe at 7.725%. The minimum Nevada sales tax rate changed on July 1, 2009.<ref>

</ref>

Largest employers

The largest employers in the state, as of the first fiscal quarter of 2011, are the following, according to the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation:<ref>“Nevada's Largest Employers – Statewide.” Nevada Workforce Informer. Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation.</ref>

Rank Employer
1 Clark County School District
2 Washoe County School District
3 Clark County
4 Wynn Las Vegas
5 Bellagio LLC
6 MGM Grand Hotel/Casino
7 Aria Resort & Casino LLC
8 Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino
9 Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department
10 Caesars Palace
11 University of Nevada, Las Vegas
12 The Venetian Casino Resort
13 The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas
14 The Mirage Casino-Hotel
15 University of Nevada, Reno
16 University Medical Center of Southern Nevada
17 The Palazzo Casino Resort
18 Flamingo Las Vegas Operating Company LLC
19 Encore Las Vegas
20 Luxor Las Vegas

Transportation

File:Nevada 28.svg

Amtrak's California Zephyr train uses the Union Pacific's original transcontinental railroad line in daily service from Chicago to Emeryville, California, serving Elko, Winnemucca, Sparks, and Reno. Amtrak Thruway Motorcoaches also provide connecting service from Las Vegas to trains at Needles, California, Los Angeles, and Bakersfield, California; and from Stateline, Nevada, to Sacramento, California. Las Vegas has had no passenger train service since Amtrak's Desert Wind was discontinued in 1997, although there have been a number of proposals to re-introduce service to either Los Angeles or Southern California.

The Union Pacific Railroad has some railroads in the north and in the south. Greyhound Lines provides some bus service.

, also known as “The Loneliest Road in America”]]

Interstate 15 passes through the southern tip of the state, serving Las Vegas and other communities. I-215 and spur route I-515 also serve the Las Vegas metropolitan area. Interstate 80 crosses through the northern part of Nevada, roughly following the path of the Humboldt River from Utah in the east and passing westward through Reno and into California. It has a spur route, I-580. Nevada also is served by several federal highways: US 6, US 50, US 93, US 95 and US 395. There are also 189 Nevada state highways. Nevada is one of a few states in the U.S. that does not have a continuous interstate highway linking its two major population centers. Even the non-interstate federal highways aren't contiguous between the Las Vegas and Reno areas.

The state is one of just a few in the country to allow semi-trailer trucks with three trailers—what might be called a “road train” in Australia. But American versions are usually smaller, in part because they must ascend and descend some fairly steep mountain passes.

RTC Transit is the public transit system in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. The agency is the largest transit agency in the state and operates a network of bus service across the Las Vegas Valley, including the use of The Deuce, double-decker buses, on the Las Vegas Strip and several outlying routes. RTC RIDE operates a system of local transit bus service throughout the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. Other transit systems in the state include Carson City's JAC. Most other counties in the state do not have public transportation at all.

Additionally, a

monorail system provides public transportation in the Las Vegas area. The Las Vegas Monorail line services several casino properties and the Las Vegas Convention Center on the east side of the Las Vegas Strip, running near Paradise Road, with a possible future extension to McCarran International Airport. Several hotels also run their own monorail lines between each other, which are typically several blocks in length.

McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas is the busiest airport serving Nevada. The Reno-Tahoe International Airport (formerly known as the Reno Cannon International Airport) is the other major airport in the state.

Law and government

Government

in Carson City]]

The government of Nevada is defined under the Constitution of Nevada as a democratic republic with three branches of government: the executive branch consisting of the Governor of Nevada and their cabinet along with the other elected constitutional officers; the legislative branch consisting of the Nevada Legislature which includes the Assembly and the Senate; and the judicial branch consisting of the Supreme Court of Nevada and lower courts.

The Governor of Nevada is the chief magistrate of Nevada,<ref name=“nvc-5-1”>NV Const. art. V, § 1.</ref> the head of the executive department of the state's government,<ref name=“nvc-5-1” /> and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces.<ref>NV Const. art. V, § 5.</ref> The current Governor of Nevada is Brian Sandoval, a Republican.

The Nevada Legislature is a bicameral body divided into an Assembly and Senate. Members of the Assembly serve for 2 years, and members of the Senate serve for 4 years. Both houses of the Nevada Legislature will be impacted by term limits starting in 2010, as Senators and Assemblymen/women will be limited to a maximum of 12 years service in each house (by appointment or election which is a lifetime limit)—a provision of the constitution which was recently upheld by the Supreme Court of Nevada in a unanimous decision. Each session of the Legislature meets for a constitutionally mandated 120 days in every odd-numbered year, or longer if the Governor calls a special session.

The Supreme Court of Nevada is the state supreme court. Original jurisdiction is divided between the District Courts (with general jurisdiction), and Justice Courts and Municipal Courts (both of limited jurisdiction).

Incorporated towns in Nevada, known as cities, are given the authority to legislate anything not prohibited by law. A recent movement has begun to permit home rule in incorporated Nevada cities to give them more flexibility and fewer restrictions from the Legislature. Town Boards for unincorporated towns are limited local governments created by either the local county commission, or by referendum, and form a purely advisory role and in no way diminish the responsibilities of the county commission that creates them.

State agencies

State departments and agencies:

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Law

]] In 1900, Nevada's population was the smallest of all states and was shrinking, as the difficulties of living in a “barren desert” began to outweigh the lure of silver for many early settlers. Historian Lawrence Friedman has explained what happened next:

:“Nevada, in a burst of ingenuity, built an economy by exploiting its sovereignty. Its strategy was to legalize all sorts of things that were illegal in California … after easy divorce came easy marriage and casino gaming. Even prostitution is legal in Nevada, in any county that decides to allow it. Quite a few of them do.”<ref>Lawrence M. Friedman, American Law in the Twentieth Century (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002), 596–597.</ref>

With the advent of air conditioning for summertime use and Southern Nevada's mild winters, the fortunes of the state began to turn around, as it did for Arizona, making these two states the fastest growing in the Union.

Prostitution

Nevada is the only state where prostitution is legal (under the form of licensed brothels).

Prostitution is specifically illegal by state law in the state's larger jurisdictions, which include Clark County (which contains Las Vegas), Washoe County (which contains Reno), and the independent city of Carson City. Otherwise, it is legal in those counties which specifically vote to permit it.

Divorce

Nevada's early reputation as a “divorce haven” arose from the fact that, prior to the no-fault divorce revolution in the 1970s, divorces were quite difficult to obtain in the United States. Already having legalized gaming and prostitution, Nevada continued the trend of boosting its profile by adopting one of the most liberal divorce statutes in the nation. This resulted in Williams v. North Carolina,

, in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that North Carolina had to give “full faith and credit” to a Nevada divorce.

Nevada's divorce rate tops the national average.<ref>

</ref>

Taxes

Nevada's tax laws are intended to draw new residents and businesses to the state. Nevada has no personal income tax or corporate income tax.<ref>

</ref> Since Nevada does not collect income data it cannot share such information with the federal government, the IRS.<ref>Nicholas Shaxson: Treasure Islands, Tax Havens and the Men Who Stole the World; The Bodley Head, London, 2011</ref>

Nevada's state sales tax rate is 6.85 percent. Counties may impose additional rates via voter approval or through approval of the Legislature; therefore, the applicable sales tax will vary by county from 6.85 percent to 8.1 percent in Clark County. Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, imposes four separate county option taxes in addition to the statewide rate – 0.25 percent for flood control, 0.50 percent for mass transit, 0.25 percent for infrastructure, and 0.25 percent for more cops. In Washoe County, which includes Reno, the sales tax rate is 7.725 percent, due to county option rates for flood control, the ReTRAC train trench project, mass transit, and an additional county rate approved under the Local Government Tax Act of 1991.<ref>

</ref>

The lodging tax rate in unincorporated Clark County, which includes the Las Vegas Strip, is 12%. Within the boundaries of the cities of Las Vegas and Henderson, the lodging tax rate is 13%.

Corporations such as Apple Inc. allegedly have set up investment companies and funds in Nevada to avoid paying taxes.<ref>

</ref>

Gay rights

In 2009, the Nevada Legislature passed a bill creating a domestic partnership registry that enables gay couples to enjoy the same rights as married couples.

Incorporation

Nevada provides friendly environment for the formation of corporations, and many (especially California) businesses have incorporated in Nevada to take advantage of the benefits of the Nevada statute. Nevada corporations offer great flexibility to the Board of Directors and simplify or avoid many of the rules that are cumbersome to business managers in some other states. In addition, Nevada has no franchise tax.

Financial institutions

Similarly, many U.S. states have usury laws limiting the amount of interest a lender can charge, but federal law allows corporations to 'import' these laws from their home state.

Drugs and alcohol

Non-alcohol drug laws are a notable exception to Nevada's otherwise libertarian principles. It is notable for having the harshest penalties for drug offenders in the country. Nevada remains the only state to still use mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines for marijuana possession. However, it is now a misdemeanor for possession of less than one ounce but only for persons age 21 and older. In 2006, voters in Nevada defeated attempts to allow possession of 1&nbsp;ounce of marijuana (for personal use) without being criminally prosecuted, (55% against legalization, 45% in favor of legalization). However, Nevada is one of the states that allows for use of marijuana for medical reasons (though this remains illegal under federal law).

Nevada has very liberal alcohol laws. Bars are permitted to remain open 24&nbsp;hours, with no “last call”. Liquor stores, convenience stores and supermarkets may also sell alcohol 24&nbsp;hours per day, and may sell beer, wine and spirits.

Smoking

Nevada voters enacted a smoking ban (“the Nevada Clean Indoor Air Act”) in November 2006 that became effective on December 8, 2006. It outlaws smoking in most workplaces and public places. Smoking is permitted in bars, but only if the bar serves no food, or the bar is inside a larger casino. Smoking is also permitted in casinos, hotel rooms, tobacco shops, and brothels.<ref>

</ref> However, some businesses do not obey this law and the government tends not to enforce it.<ref>

</ref> In 2011, smoking restrictions in Nevada were loosened for certain places which allow only people age 21 or older inside.<ref>http://www.blacklobellolaw.com/tag/smoking-ban-loosened/</ref>

Crime

logo]] Nevada has been ranked as the most dangerous state in the U.S. for five years in a row, just ahead of Louisiana<ref name=“KIROTV”>

</ref><ref name=“cqpress”>

</ref> In 2006, the crime rate in Nevada was approximately 24% higher than the national average rate. Property crimes accounted for approximately 84.6% of the crime rate in Nevada which was 21% higher than the national rate. The remaining 20.3% were violent crimes and were approximately 45% higher than other states.<ref name=“NICIC”>

</ref> In 2008, Nevada had the third highest murder rate, and the highest rate of robbery and motor vehicle theft.<ref name=“KIROTV”/> Latest data also ranks Nevada as having the highest rate of women killed by men, for the third year in row, and Nevada has topped the list five out of the last six years.<ref>

</ref><ref>

</ref>

Politics

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic
2012 45.68% 463,567 52.36% 531,373
2008 42.65% 412,827 55.15% 533,736
2004 50.47% 418,690 47.88% 397,190
2000 49.49% 301,575 45.94% 279,978
1996 44.55% 198,775 45.60% 203,388
1992 34.71% 175,828 37.41% 189,148
Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of June 2010<ref>

</ref>

Party Active Voters Inactive Voters Total Voters Percentage

Democratic 456,672 126,158 580,393 43.10%

Republican 398,898 79,414 475,764 35.33%

Unaffiliated 163,816 49,731 213,329 15.84%

Minor Parties 57,984 19,352 77,079 5.72%
Total 1,077,370 274,655 1,346,565 100%

State politics

Due to heavy growth in the southern portion of the state, there is a noticeable divide between politics of northern and southern Nevada. The north has long maintained control of key positions in state government, even while the population of southern Nevada is larger than the rest of the state combined. The north sees the high population south becoming more influential and perhaps commanding majority rule. The south sees the north as the “old guard” trying to rule as an oligarchy. This has fostered some resentment, however, due to a term limit amendment passed by Nevada voters in 1994, and again in 1996, some of the north's hold over key positions will soon be forfeited to the south, leaving Northern Nevada with less power.

Historically, northern Nevada has been very Republican. The more rural counties of the north are among the most conservative regions of the country. Washoe County, home to Reno, has historically been strongly Republican, but has become more of a swing county at least at the federal level. Clark County, home to Las Vegas, has become increasingly Democratic.

Clark and Washoe counties have long dominated the state's politics. Between them, they cast 87 percent of Nevada's vote, and elect a substantial majority of the state legislature. The great majority of the state's elected officials are either from Las Vegas or Reno.

An August 2012 Public Policy Polling survey found that 47% of Nevada voters supported legalizing same-sex marriage, with 42% thinking it should be illegal, and 11% were not sure. In a separate question, 80% of Nevada voters supported legal recognition of same-sex couples, while 17% opposed all legal recognition and 3% were not sure.<ref>http://www.publicpolicypolling.com/main/2012/08/nevada-senate-race-still-a-toss-up.html</ref>

National politics

Nevada has voted for the winner in every presidential election since 1912, except in 1976 when it voted for Gerald Ford over Jimmy Carter. This includes Nevada supporting Democrat Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996, Republican George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004, and Democrat Barack Obama winning the state in both 2008 and 2012. This gives the state status as a political bellwether. Since 1912, Nevada has been carried by the presidential victor the most out of any state (25 of 26 elections).<ref>

</ref> Nevada was one of only three states won by John F. Kennedy in the American West in the election of 1960, albeit narrowly.<ref>

</ref>

The state's U.S. Senators are Democrat Harry Reid, the Senate Majority Leader, and Republican Dean Heller. The Governorship is held by Brian Sandoval, a Republican from Reno.

Education

Education in Nevada is achieved through public and private elementary, middle, and high schools, as well as colleges and universities. The Clark County School District, which serves Clark County, is the fifth largest school district in the United States.

Colleges and universities

Research institutes

Parks and recreation areas

]]

Recreation areas maintained by the Federal Government

Northern Nevada

Southern Nevada

Wilderness

There are 68 designated wilderness areas in Nevada, protecting some

under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Bureau of Land Management.<ref>

</ref>

State parks

Sports

Nevada is not well known for its professional sports, but the state takes pride in college sports, most notably it's college football. Especially the Nevada Wolf Pack (representing the University of Nevada, Reno) of the Mountain West Conference – and the UNLV Rebels (representing the University of Nevada, Las Vegas) also of the Mountain West Conference. In 2012, The University of Nevada, Reno joined its cross-state rival in the MWC.

UNLV is most remembered for its men's basketball program, which experienced its height of supremacy in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Coached by Jerry Tarkanian, the Runnin' Rebels became one of the most elite programs in the country. In 1990, UNLV won the Men's Division I Championship by defeating Duke 103–73, which set tournament records for most points scored by a team and largest margin of victory in the national title game.

In 1991, UNLV finished the regular season undefeated. Forward Larry Johnson won several awards, including the Naismith Award. UNLV reached the Final Four yet again, but lost their national semifinal against Duke 79–77, and is referred to as one of the biggest upsets in the NCAA Tournament. The Runnin' Rebels were the Associated Press pre-season No. 1 back to back (1989–90, 1990–91). North Carolina is the only other team to accomplish that (2007–08, 2008–09).

The state is also home to one of the most famous tennis players of all time, Andre Agassi.

Along with significant rises in popularity in mixed martial arts (MMA), a number of fight leagues such as the UFC have taken interest in Las Vegas as a primary event location due to the number of suitable host venues. The Mandalay Bay Events Center and MGM Grand Garden Arena are among some of the more popular venues for fighting events such as MMA and have hosted several UFC and other MMA title fights. It has currently held the most UFC events with 74 events held in total.

Nevada sports teams

Professional

College

The state is also home to the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, which hosts the Kobalt Tools 400 and the National Finals Rodeo which is held at the Thomas and Mack Center.

The Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame provides educational resources and promotes the aerospace and aviation history of the state.<ref>

</ref>

Military

Several United States Navy ships have been named USS ''Nevada'' in honor of the state. They include:

Area 51 is located near Groom Lake, a dry salt lake bed. The much smaller Creech Air Force Base is located in Indian Springs, Nevada; Hawthorne Army Depot in Hawthorne; the Tonopah Test Range near Tonopah; and Nellis AFB in the northeast part of the Las Vegas Valley. Naval Air Station Fallon in Fallon; NSAWC, (pronounced “EN-SOCK”) in western Nevada. NSAWC consolidated three Command Centers into a single Command Structure under a flag officer on July 11, 1996. The Naval Strike Warfare Center (STRIKE “U”) based at NAS Fallon since 1984, was joined with the Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) and the Carrier Airborne Early Warning Weapons School (TOPDOME) which both moved from NAS Miramar as a result of a Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) decision in 1993 which transferred that installation back to the Marine Corps as MCAS Miramar. The Seahawk Weapon School was added in 1998 to provide tactical training for Navy helicopters.

These bases host a number of activities including the Joint Unmanned Aerial Systems Center of Excellence, the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center, Nevada Test and Training Range, Red Flag, the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, the United States Air Force Warfare Center, the United States Air Force Weapons School, and the United States Navy Fighter Weapons School.

Songs about Nevada

  • “Silver State Fanfare” – the Official State March by Gerald G. Willis. Codified by the Nevada Legislature in 2001 at NRS 235.035
  • “Sands of Nevada” from Mark Knopfler's 2000 release Sailing to Philadelphia
  • “Sin City” from Limbeck's 2005 release Let Me Come Home
  • Home Means Nevada”, the state song of Nevada, by Bertha Rafetto
  • “Nevada” by Riders in the Sky from the album Best of the West
  • “Night Time In Nevada” by Dulmage/Clint/Pascoe, 1931
  • “Nevada's Grace” by Atreyu, twelfth track off 2004's The Curse
  • “Battle Born” by The Killers off the 2012 album also named “Battle Born” inspired by the Nevada Flag
  • “Winner's Casino” by Richmond Fontaine off the 2002 album “Winnemucca”
  • “Reno” by Doug Supernaw off the album “Red and Rio Grande” released in 1993.
  • “Ooh Las Vegas” by Gram Parsons off the album “Return Of The Grievous Angel”.
  • “Darcy Farrow” by Jimmie Dale Gilmore off the album “One Endless Night”.

Future issues

Nevada enjoys many economic advantages, and the southern portion of the state enjoys mild winter weather, but rapid growth has led to some overcrowded roads and schools. Nevada has the nation's 5th largest school district in the Clark County School District (projected fall 2007 enrollment is 314,000 students grades K-12).<ref>

</ref> While the state was recently one of the fastest growing in the country, population growth slowed down to a halt in 2008.<ref>

</ref>

In August 2008, it was announced that Boyd Gaming would halt construction on a 4.2&nbsp;billion dollar project called Echelon, which was to replace the old Stardust Resort & Casino. The reason cited for this is lack of funding/credit from banks.

Coyote Springs is a proposed community for 240,000 inhabitants in Clark and Lincoln counties. It would be Nevada's largest planned city. The town is being developed by Harvey Whittemore and has generated some controversy because of environmental concerns and allegations of political favoritism.<ref>

</ref>

State symbols

areas of Nevada]]

See also

Notes

References

}}

/

| Northeast =
| West = {{flag|California}}
| Centre = '' Nevada'': [[Outline of Nevada|Outline]] • [[Index of Nevada-related articles|Index]]
| East = {{flag|Utah}}
| Southwest =
| South =
| Southeast = {{flag|Arizona}}
}}

1864 in Nevada Nevada States and territories established in 1864 States of the United States Western United States

Population: 2 million.

Population Density: 18 per square mile (Rank 13 of JWR’s top 19 states).

Area: 110,561 square miles (rank 7 of 50).

Average car insurance cost: $937/yr. (rank 7 of 50).

Average home insurance cost: $479/yr. (rank 21 of 50).

Crime Safety Ranking: 49 of 50 because of Las Vegas

Boston T. Party’s State Firearms Laws Ranking: 76%.

Per capita income: $29,506 (15 rank of 50).

ACT & SAT Scores Ranking: 25 of 50.

Comments: One editor listed in the acknowledgements stubbornly insists that my ranking below is unfair to parts of Nevada. Nevada is really “a tale of two states”: Las Vegas and then all the rest. Las Vegas has the same urban problems as Los Angeles, which affects the insurance and crime numbers above. Las Vegas has a severe desert climate that is hostile to agriculture, and most residents are dependent on water from elsewhere. Las Vegas is not worth of consideration, and its influence on the state’s statistics conceals a very viable and potentially desirable relocation relocation alternative in Northern Nevada.

Plusses

No income tax, relatively pro-gun ownership, except for Clark County, Nevada's (Las Vegas) handgun registration laws. Northern Nevada, particularly Reno and the Carson Valley, Nevada (which will be listed second tier relocation region in my subsequent posts) have mild summers not requiring air-conditioning, ample water from snow melt from the Sierra Nevada mountain range, widespread ranching and hay production, better schools than Las Vegas, and solidly conservative political demographics (except for inner Reno). Healthy economy with many companies relocating from California. Northern Nevada is considered an ideal off-the-grid solar power location, with plenty of sun during the moderately chilly winters.

Nevada is not recommended for a survivalist with a small to moderate budget. However, for someone who is wealthy and who can stand the climate, Nevada should be bumped up a notch or two. Taxes will be a big issue for you — and Nevada has no income tax. As someone “of means” you will be able to afford lots of food storage, voluminous fuel storage, and a large greenhouse to make up for the hot summers/cold winters climate of the Nevada high country. (See my posts in a week or two for specific recommendations within Nevada: site:survivalblog.com Nevada)

Minuses

Expensive land in the more desirable areas with plentiful water. May suffer from the “Golden Horde” effect–a huge wave of refugees and looters pouring in from more populous California in in the event of an abrupt TEOTWAWKI. Water is scarce in Nevada, at least south and east of the Sierras.

Also consider: extremely high crime rate (Las Vegas severely skews this statistic), minimal agriculture (except for some hay growing and ranching in the northern portions of the state), high sales tax, expensive car registration for newer cars (but a friend in Nevada reports that a 10-year-old vehicle that was originally purchased for $50,000 costs only $68 per year to register), exploding population growth (the fastest in the U.S. due primarily to Las Vegas), the lowest church attendance rate in the country (ranked 50 of 50 - the state is more libertarian than conservative), and heavy dependence on gambling for tax revenue. Has a low rating in “education freedom” for home schooling (ranked #47 of 50). While Nevada's calculated per capita “tax burden” is 12% higher than the national average for all 50 states, much of this comes from tourist gambling revenues, so those non-gamblers in their prime earning years may still find Nevada to be a relatively low tax haven. Nevada has refreshingly lax incorporation laws. There is a risk that statewide political control could shift to the pro-tax liberals of Las Vegas (although the state Constitution requires a 2/3 majority to create an income tax). Some central and northern regions of the state with plentiful surface water are recommended—but with provisos.

JWR’s Combined Retreat Potential Ranking: 14 of 19 (Note: I’d probably rank it at 7 or 8 if it weren't for Las Vegas.)

Fair Use Disclaimer Source: http://www.survivalblog.com/retreatareas.html

see also Survival Retreat Locations, American Redoubt, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington, Wyoming

nevada.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/12 18:36 (external edit)