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Snippet from Wikipedia: Linux Mint

Linux Mint is a community-driven Linux distribution based on Ubuntu or Debian. Linux Mint comes bundled with a variety of free and open-source applications and can provide full out-of-the-box multimedia support for those who choose (by ticking one box as part of the installation process of the OS) to include some proprietary software, such as multimedia codecs.

The project was created by Clément Lefèbvre and is being actively developed by the Linux Mint Team and community.

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}} Linux Mint is a Linux distribution for desktop computers, based on either Ubuntu or Debian. Linux Mint is aimed at being a “modern, elegant and comfortable operating system which is both powerful and easy to use.” Mint provides full out-of-the-box multimedia support by including some proprietary software such as Adobe Flash. Mint's motto is “from freedom came elegance”.<ref>

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New versions of Linux Mint are released every six months. The first release, named “Ada”, was released in 2006.

, its latest and 16th release is “Petra”.

History

Linux Mint started in 2006 with a beta release of version 1.0, codenamed “Ada”, based on Kubuntu. Following its release, version 2.0 was the first version to use Ubuntu as its codebase. Mint had few users from these early versions until the release of 3.0, “Cassandra.”<ref>

</ref><ref name=“oldreleases”>

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Version 2.0 “Barbara” was based on Ubuntu 6.10, using its package repositories and using it as a codebase. From there, Linux Mint followed its own codebase, building each release from its previous one but it continued to use the package repositories from the latest Ubuntu release. As such the distribution never really forked.

This resulted in making the base between the two systems almost identical and it guaranteed full compatibility between the two operating systems.

In 2008, Linux Mint adopted the same release cycle as Ubuntu and dropped its minor version number before releasing version 5 “Elyssa”. The same year, in an effort to increase the compatibility between the two systems, Linux Mint decided to abandon its code-base and changed the way it built its releases.

Starting with version 6 “Felicia” each release was now completely based on the latest Ubuntu release, built directly from it, timed for approximately one month after the corresponding Ubuntu release (i.e. usually in May and November).

In 2010 Linux Mint released Linux Mint Debian Edition. Unlike the other Ubuntu-based editions, it is a rolling release based directly on Debian GNU/Linux and is not tied to Ubuntu packages or its release schedule.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Releases

<!– The old blogs in http://blog.linuxmint.com/ should be incredibly useful in gathering information on Mint and for specific info about old releases –>

There are two Linux Mint releases per year, generally timed one month after Ubuntu releases. Each version of Linux Mint is given an integer version number and is codenamed with a female first name, based on a letter of the alphabet that increases with every iteration.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Linux Mint does not communicate specific release dates, as new versions are published “when ready”, meaning that they can be released early when the distribution is ahead of schedule or late when critical bugs are found.<ref>

</ref> The current major release is Linux Mint 16 “Petra”, released on 30 November 2013.<ref name=“Linux Mint 16 Petra released!”>

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<!–Keep the table short and tidy. If you want more information go to the main article for releases. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Version for more documentation.–>

Version Code name Release date Support status

Ada 2006-08-27 Obsolete since April 2008.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Barbara 2006-11-13 Obsolete since April 2008.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Bea 2006-12-20 Obsolete since April 2008.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Bianca 2007-02-20 Obsolete since April 2008.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Cassandra 2007-05-30 Obsolete since October 2008.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Celena 2007-09-24<ref>

</ref>

Obsolete since October 2008.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Daryna 2007-10-15 Obsolete since April 2009.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Elyssa 2008-06-08 Long term support release (LTS), obsolete since April 2011.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Felicia 2008-12-15 Obsolete since April 2010.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Gloria 2009-05-26 Obsolete since October 2010.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Helena 2009-11-29 Obsolete since April 2011.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Isadora 2010-05-18<ref>

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Long-term support release (LTS), obsolete since April 2013.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Julia 2010-11-12<ref>

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Obsolete since April 2012.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Katya 2011-05-26<ref>

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Obsolete since October 2012.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Lisa 2011-11-26<ref>

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Obsolete since April 2013.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Maya 2012-05-23<ref>

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Long term support release (LTS), supported until April 2017.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Nadia 2012-11-20<ref>

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Supported until April 2014.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Olivia 2013-05-29<ref name=“Linux Mint 15 Olivia released!”>

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Supported until January 2014.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>

Petra 2013-11-30<ref name=“Linux Mint 16 Petra released!”/> Supported until July 2014.<ref name=“oldreleases”/>
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Features

Linux Mint primarily uses free and open source software, making exceptions for some proprietary software, such as plug-ins and codecs that provide Adobe Flash, MP3, and DVD playback.<ref>Linux Mint FAQ: What about proprietary software?</ref><ref name=“computerw”>

</ref><ref>

</ref> Linux Mint's inclusion of proprietary software is uncommon;

most Linux distributions do not include proprietary software by default, as a common goal for Linux distributions is to adhere to the model of free and open source software.

Linux Mint comes with a wide range of software installed that includes LibreOffice, Firefox, Thunderbird, XChat, Pidgin, Transmission and GIMP. Additional software that is not installed by default can be downloaded using the package manager. Linux Mint allows networking ports to be closed using its firewall, with customized port selection available. The default Linux Mint desktop environments, MATE and Cinnamon, support many languages.<ref>

</ref><ref>

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Linux Mint can also run many programs designed for Microsoft Windows (such as Microsoft Office), using the Wine software or using virtualization software (such as VMware Workstation or VirtualBox).

Linux Mint is available with a number of desktop environments to choose from, including Cinnamon, MATE, KDE, and Xfce. Other desktop environments can be installed via APT.

Linux Mint actively develops software for its operating system. Most of the development is done in Python and the source code is available on GitHub.<ref>

</ref>

Software developed by Linux Mint

  • Cinnamon: A fork of GNOME Shell based on the innovations made in Mint Gnome Shell Extensions (MGSE). Released as an add-on for Linux Mint 12 and available as a default desktop environment since Linux Mint 13.<ref>

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  • MintTools
    • Software Manager (mintInstall): Runs .mint files, which are files containing instructions to install packages. As of Linux Mint 6, this tool has been revamped, and now enables viewing of all the applications on the Mint Software Portal offline, provided an Internet connection is available to download the information first. Also enables installation of any of the programs listed directly from the desktop, instead of going to the site. The option to use the old mintInstall program is available; from here the Ubuntu Repositories or the GetDeb.net website may be searched.
    • Update Manager (mintUpdate): Designed to prevent inexperienced users from installing updates that are unnecessary or require a certain level of knowledge to configure properly. It assigns updates a safety-level (from 1 to 5), based on the stability and necessity of the update. Updates can be set to notify users (as is normal), be listed but not notify, or be hidden by default. In addition to including updates specifically for the Linux Mint distribution, the development team tests all package-wide updates.
    • Main Menu (mintMenu): An advanced menu, featuring filtering, installation and removal of software, system and places links, favorites, session management, editable items, custom places and many configuration options. Also ported to MATE in Linux Mint 12 (Lisa).<ref>

      </ref>

    • Backup tool (mintBackup): Enables the user to back up and restore data, as well as upgrade to newer releases by performing fresh installations.
    • Upload Manager (mintUpload): Defines upload services for FTP, SFTP and SCP servers. Services are then available in the system tray and provide zones where they may be automatically uploaded to their corresponding destinations.
    • Domain Blocker (mintNanny): A basic domain blocking parental control tool. Enables the user to manually add domains to be blocked system wide. This tool was introduced with the release of Linux Mint 6.
    • Desktop Settings: A desktop configuration tool for easy configuration of the desktop.
    • Welcome screen (mintWelcome): Introduced in Linux Mint 7, an application that starts on the first login of any new account. It shows a dialogue window welcoming the user to Linux Mint, and providing links to the Linux Mint website, user guide and community website.
    • Remastering tool (mintConstructor): A tool for remastering Linux Mint. It is not installed by default in any Linux Mint edition, but is included in the repositories and used by the developers for creating ISO files. Users interested in creating their own distribution based on Linux Mint can make use of this tool to do so.
  • Mint Gnome Shell Extensions (MGSE): A desktop layer on top of GNOME 3 to make it feel like GNOME 2. Includes a bottom panel, an application menu, the window list, task-centric desktop (i.e. switches between windows, not applications) and system tray icons. It is designed to give users a traditional desktop environment. This was included in Linux Mint in version 12 (Lisa).<ref>

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Installation

Installation of Linux Mint is generally performed with the Live CD.<ref>

</ref> The Linux Mint OS can be run directly from the CD (albeit with a significant performance loss), allowing a user to “test-drive” the OS for hardware compatibility and driver support. The CD also contains the Ubiquity installer, which can guide the user through the permanent installation process.

The main edition of Linux Mint is available in 32-bit and 64-bit. Installation CD images can be downloaded for free, or installation CDs purchased from 3rd party vendors.<ref>

</ref><ref>

</ref> Linux Mint can be booted and run from a USB Flash drive, with the option of saving settings to the flash drive. This persistent thumb drive version allows a portable installation to be run on any PC capable of booting from a USB drive. The USB creator program is available to install Linux Mint (Ubuntu, not LMDE) on a USB drive.

A Microsoft Windows migration tool, Migration Assistant, can be used to import bookmarks, desktop background (wallpaper), and various settings from an existing Windows installation into a new Linux Mint installation.

The Windows installer “Mint4Win”, is included on the Live CD and allows Linux Mint to be installed from within Microsoft Windows, much like the Wubi installer for Ubuntu. The operating system can then be removed similar to any other Windows software using the Windows Control Panel. This method requires no partitioning of the hard drive. It is only useful for Windows users; it is not meant for permanent installations because it incurs a slight performance loss.

Installation supports LVM and disk encryption since Linux Mint 15 but only with automatic partitioning.

UTF-8 is the default character encoding and allows for support of a variety of non-Roman scripts.

Editions

Linux Mint has multiple versions that are based upon Ubuntu, with various desktop environments available. Linux Mint also has a version based upon Debian. Note that the table below shows the default environments, not the available environments.

Default desktop environments of Linux Mint 16 (2013) and LMDE 201303
Cinnamon MATE KDE Xfce GNOME LXDE Fluxbox
32-bit 64-bit 32-bit 64-bit 32-bit 64-bit 32-bit 64-bit 32-bit 64-bit 32-bit 64-bit 32-bit 64-bit
Linux Mint 16 (Petra)<ref name=“petra”>

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colspan=“2” <!–Cinnamon–>

colspan=“2” <!–MATE–>

colspan=“2” <!–KDE–>

colspan=“2” <!–Xfce–>

colspan=“2” <!–GNOME–>

<!–LXDE 32-bit–>

<!–LXDE 64-bit–>

<!–Fluxbox 32-bit–>

<!–Fluxbox 64-bit–>

Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE)<ref>

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colspan=“2” <!–Cinnamon–>

colspan=“2” <!–MATE–>

colspan=“2” <!–KDE–>

colspan=“2” <!–Xfce–>

colspan=“2” <!–GNOME–>

colspan=“2” <!–LXDE–>

colspan=“2” <!–Fluxbox–>

Windows Installer<ref name=“petra” /><ref name=“rel_olivia”>

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colspan=“2” <!–Cinnamon–>

colspan=“2” <!–MATE–>

colspan=“2” <!–KDE–>

colspan=“2” <!–Xfce–>

colspan=“2” <!–GNOME–>

colspan=“2” <!–LXDE–>

colspan=“2” <!–Fluxbox–>

Ubuntu-based editions

As of Linux Mint 13,<ref>

</ref> there are two main editions of Linux Mint, developed by the core development team and using Ubuntu as a base. One includes Mint's own Cinnamon as the desktop environment while the other uses MATE. Linux Mint also develops editions that feature the KDE and Xfce desktop environments by default, but these have secondary priority and are generally released somewhat later than the two main editions.

OEM version

The distribution provides a manufacturer-targeted OEM version.<ref>

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No Codecs version

The distribution provides a “No Codecs” version, previously known as the “Universal Edition”,<ref>

</ref> for magazines, companies and distributors in the USA, Japan and countries where the legislation allows patents to apply to software and distribution of restricted technologies may require the acquisition of 3rd party licenses.<ref>Download - Linux Mint<!-- Bot generated title --></ref> Multimedia codecs can be installed at any time via a link on the Mint Welcome Screen or a desktop launcher available for only No Codecs version.

Linux Mint Debian Edition

Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) is based directly on Debian Testing, instead of Ubuntu. The purpose of LMDE is to look identical to the Ubuntu based edition and to provide the same functionality, while using “real” Debian as a base.<ref name=“lmde”>

</ref> LMDE is available with the MATE and Cinnamon desktop environments.<ref>

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LMDE has a semi-rolling release (partially rolling) development model. This means that, unlike Debian Testing (a “real” rolling release) which constantly receives updates, LMDE periodically introduces “Update Packs” which are tested snapshots of Debian Testing.<ref name=“lmde”/> Installing these Update Packs keeps LMDE current, and there is no need for reinstalling the system every 6 months like in Ubuntu based distros. LMDE does not use the Debian package repositories, but has its own, although it is indeed possible to track the Debian repos directly, be it Testing (currently Jessie) or Unstable (Sid), if users choose to do so at their own risk.

System requirements

Linux Mint 15 “Olivia” has the following system requirements:<ref>The Linux Mint Blog » Blog Archive » Linux Mint15 “Olivia” released!</ref>

Minimum Recommended
Processor (x86) 600&nbsp;MHz 1&nbsp;GHz
Memory 512&nbsp;MB 1&nbsp;GB
Hard Drive (free space) 5&nbsp;GB 10&nbsp;GB
Monitor Resolution 800×600 1024×768

Both Intel x86 and AMD64 architectures are supported. A supported GPU is required for visual effects.

Development

Individual users and companies using the operating system act as donors,<ref>

</ref> sponsors<ref>

</ref> and partners<ref>

</ref> of the distribution. Linux Mint relies on user feedback to make decisions and orient its development. The official blog often features discussions where users are asked to voice their opinion about the latest features or decisions implemented for upcoming releases. Ideas can be submitted, commented upon and rated by users via the Linux Mint Community Website.<ref>

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The community of Linux Mint users use Launchpad to participate in the translation of the operating system and in reporting bugs.<ref>

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Most extraneous development is done in Python and organized on-line on GitHub, making it easy for developers to provide patches, to implement additional features or even to fork Linux Mint sub-projects (for example The Linux Mint menu was ported to Fedora). With each release, features are added that are developed by the community. In Linux Mint 9 for instance, the ability to edit menu items is a feature that was contributed by a Linux Mint user.<ref>

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The members of the development team are spread around the world and they communicate through private forums, emails and IRC.

Linux Mint reviews are tracked by the distribution and discussed by the development team and the community of users.<ref>

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Package classification

Linux Mint divides its software repositories into four main channels that reflect differences in their nature and in their origin.

;main: Provides only software that is developed by Linux Mint. ;upstream: Provides software which is present in Ubuntu but patched or modified by Linux Mint. As a result, the software provided by this channel behaves differently in each distribution. Notable examples are Grub, Plymouth, Ubiquity, Xchat, USB Creator and Yelp (the help system). ;import: Provides software that is not available in Ubuntu or for which no recent versions are available in Ubuntu. Notable examples are Opera, Picasa, Skype, Songbird, the 64-bit Adobe Flash plugin and Frostwire. ;romeo: Not enabled by default. Provides test packages before they are promoted to other (stable) channels. As such it represents the unstable branch of Linux Mint.

Additionally, there is a “backport” channel for ports of newer software to older releases without affecting the other channels. It is not enabled by default.

Reception

Linux Mint has been praised for focusing on desktop users.<ref>

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In 2012 Linux Mint surpassed Ubuntu as the most viewed distro on their site.<ref>Ubuntu Shows DistroWatch Decline as Mint Soars | PCWorld<!-- Bot generated title --></ref><ref>Linux Mint Touches All Time High On DistroWatch, Will Ubuntu Recover? - Muktware<!-- Bot generated title --></ref>

In a 2012 online poll at Lifehacker, Linux Mint was voted the best Linux distribution after Ubuntu, with around 16% of the votes.<ref>

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In Issue 162, Linux Format named Mint the best distro for 2012.

In Issue 128 (July 2013), Linux User and Developer gave Linux Mint 15 (“Olivia”) a score of 5/5, stating “We haven't found a single problem with the distro… we're more than satisfied with the smooth, user-friendly experience that Linux Mint 15, and Cinnamon 1.8, provides for it to be our main distro for at least another 6 months.”<ref name=“lud-128”>

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The distribution has far surpassed the long-standing Ubuntu (Operating System) operating system as the most popular Linux operating system on Distrowatch by a factor of almost 2:1.<ref>

</ref><ref name=Second>distrowatch.com. Retrieved 16 March 2013.</ref><ref>Ubuntu popularity falls as Linux Mint flourishes - The Inquirer<!-- Bot generated title --></ref>

See also

References

linux_mint.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/12 18:35 (external edit)