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see God and God

“The horse is made ready for battle, but victory rests with the LORD - Proverbs 21:31

“The God of my rock; in him will I trust: he is my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my high tower, and my refuge, my saviour; thou savest me from violence.” - 2 Samuel 22:3 (KJV)

<small>This article is about the biblical God. For the term as used to refer to any divine being, see Other Gods</small>

God is the sovereign creator and eternal ruler of all things and beings that exist, whether in the physical universe or in the spiritual realm (Heaven). Not only is God the creator and ruler of the things and beings within those two realms, but he is also the creator of the realms themselves. God created the physical universe, and before he acted in this creation, the universe did not exist. Likewise God did with the spiritual realm.

God is Revealed: How we know about God

Other than creation itself, God is revealed in several ways, including conscience and special revelation (the Bible, and prophets). Most importantly though, God is revealed in Jesus Christ, who is the Son of God.

Cordoba, Spain.]]

Attributes or Character of God

, Ascension.]] The attributes of God are things that describe who he is. Similar to the way one might describe a close friend to another individual, so too do these attributes describe God's character and nature. Attributes of God include but are not limited to Wisdom, Infinitude, Sovereignty, Holiness, Trinity, Omniscience, Faithfulness, Love, Omnipotence, Self-existence, Self-sufficiency, Justice, Immutability, Mercy, Eternal, Goodness, Gracious, and Omnipresence. These attributes all work in complete and perfect harmony with one another.

God exercises eternal and righteous judgment of the wicked in hell, because of an inherent problem in the human heart, namely Sin. According to the Bible, the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the cross of calvary and then resurrection, is God's merciful and gracious response to the problem of the human heart.

God is Triune

Although the Bible does not use the term, it is clear that God is a triune God, or three in one. These are sometimes referred to as God the Father, God the Son (Jesus), and the Holy Spirit.

The first hint of the Trinity is in

which relates God saying, “Let us make man in our image”, indicating that God is a plurality.

The three persons of God are treated as equivalents in these words of Jesus shortly after His resurrection:

Jesus is God

, Michelangelo.]]

The first verse of the Gospel of John, in which Jesus is referred to as the “Word”, makes clear that Jesus is synonymous with God:

This verse not only says that “the Word” (Jesus) is synonymous with God, but also says that the Word was “in the beginning”, which means that He existed before all else existed, something that is only true of God.

This is reinforced two verses later, in which Jesus is described as the creator. Genesis refers to God as being the Creator.

The Holy Spirit is God

In the following passage, the Holy Spirit is referred to as God:

God is omniscient

God knows everything:

Because God is outside of time, He can see and knows the past and the future as well as the present.

"God" sometimes used to refer to God the Father

(1840-1912).]] In the bible, the word “God” (θεός) does not always refer to God's being as a whole, but more specifically refers to the Person of the Father (God the Father). Here are some verses which demonstrate this:

Notice how in each case, “Father” can be substituted for “God.” For example, “For the Father so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son,” and “not that we loved the Father, but that He loved us and sent His Son.”

Terminology

The Bible uses several different words to refer to God. “God” itself is not a name, but an Old English word meaning supreme being, diety,<ref>God Online Etymology Dictionary.</ref> which the translators who translated the Bible in to English chose as the appropriate English word for the Hebrew elohim and the Greek theos used in the Old Testament and New Testament respectively.<ref name=“DPK”>Kruse, Dale P.,More on the ''Names'' of God In the Bible, Advanced Training Program of Evangelism.</ref>

The other main term for God is the Hebrew adonai, usually translated Lord. There are various compound words also used in the Bible, such as el shaddai, which means God Almighty (”el“ is a short version of elohim).<ref name=“DPK” />

YHWH is given in the Bible as God's actual name. In most English Bibles it is translated as Lord, in small capitals. The name has various other English versions, including Yehovah, Jehovah, and Yahweh.<ref>McHyde, Tim, God’s Name: LORD, Yahweh, Yahveh, YHWH, YHVH, Jehovah or Yehovah?</ref>

Resources on becoming a Christian

See also

References

Christianity Divine Beings


see also Tathagatagarbha (God), God in Buddhism, Trinity in Buddhism

[[wp>Dharmakaya]], [[wp>Eternal Buddha]]


Snippet from Wikipedia: God

In monotheistic thought, God is conceived of as the supreme being, creator deity, and principal object of faith. God is usually conceived as being omniscient (all-knowing), omnipotent (all-powerful), omnipresent (all-present) and as having an eternal and necessary existence. These attributes are used either in way of analogy or are taken literally. God is most often held to be incorporeal (immaterial). Incorporeality and corporeality of God are related to conceptions of transcendence (being outside nature) and immanence (being in nature) of God, with positions of synthesis such as the "immanent transcendence".

Some religions describe God without reference to gender, while others or their translations use terminology that is gender-specific and gender-biased.

God has been conceived as either personal or impersonal. In theism, God is the creator and sustainer of the universe, while in deism, God is the creator, but not the sustainer, of the universe. In pantheism, God is the universe itself. In atheism, there is an absence of belief in God. In agnosticism, the existence of God is deemed unknown or unknowable. God has also been conceived as the source of all moral obligation, and the "greatest conceivable existent". Many notable philosophers have developed arguments for and against the existence of God.

Monotheists refer to their gods using names prescribed by their respective religions, with some of these names referring to certain cultural ideas about their god's identity and attributes. In the ancient Egyptian era of Atenism, possibly the earliest recorded monotheistic religion, this deity was called Aten, premised on being the one "true" Supreme Being and creator of the universe. In the Hebrew Bible and Judaism, Elohim, Adonai, YHWH (Hebrew: יהוה‎) and other names are used as the names of God. Yahweh and Jehovah, possible vocalizations of YHWH, are used in Christianity. In the Christian doctrine of the Trinity, God, coexisting in three "persons", is called the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. In Islam, the name Allah is used, while Muslims also have a multitude of titular names for God. In Hinduism, Brahman is often considered a monistic concept of God. In Chinese religion, Shangdi is conceived as the progenitor (first ancestor) of the universe, intrinsic to it and constantly bringing order to it. Other religions have names for the concept of God, including Baha in the Bahá'í Faith, Waheguru in Sikhism, Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa in Balinese Hinduism, and Ahura Mazda in Zoroastrianism.

god.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/12 18:34 (external edit)