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Copper, the 29th element, is a metal. In industry it is praised for its extreme ductility and electrical conductivity which make it an excellent material for wires. Copper is also a nutrient mineral, and is required by the human body to perform certain chemical reactions.

Copper is also important culturally, as one of the first metals to be used by humankind, especially in its alloy form bronze. Even today the pennies in the United States are informally referred to as “coppers.”

The atomic symbol for copper, Cu, comes from the Latin cuprum which also gives its name (via Greek) to Cyprus, an island nation in the Mediterranean renowned for its wealth of copper.

Copper is usually mixed with tin to form bronze, and was a key metal during the Bronze Age.

The Price of Copper and the U.S. Economy

The price of copper has traditionally been one of the very best economic indicator of the future performance of the U.S. economy. Many analysts are concerned.<ref>Barnato, Katy, “‘Dr. Copper’ Tells Markets the Party’s Over: Albert Edwards”. CNBC, Published May 2, 2013. Accessed February 20, 2015.</ref>. “Copper is viewed by some analysts as a signal of turning points in the world economy, as well as an indicator of whether it is safe to buy cyclical industrial stocks.<ref>Ibid.</ref>

“Copper's downward trend foreshadows a stock market collapse, according to Societe Generale's famously bearish strategist Albert Edwards, who said equity markets will riot 'Japan-style.'” <blockquote>“Copper is acting exactly as it did when I wrote about the impotence of liquidity in the face of the (then imminent) 2007 recession. Once again it is giving us an early warning that liquidity will not save risky assets: time to get out of equities.”<ref>Snyder, Michael, ”The Price Of Copper And 11 Other Recession Indicators That Are Flashing Red“. Economic Collapse Blog, Published May 7, 2013. Accessed February 20, 2015.</ref></blockquote>

See Also

References

Fair Use References are embedded in the above article as footnotes.

<references />

Ammunition Components Ammunition Handloading Firearms Glossary Firearms Electrical Engineering Electricity Electronics Amateur Radio Investments in Tangibles Survivalism


Snippet from Wikipedia: Copper

Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement.

Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from c. 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, c. 5000 BC; the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC; and the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.

In the Roman era, copper was mined principally on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes сyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to сuprum (Latin). Coper (Old English) and copper were derived from this, the later spelling first used around 1530.

Commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments.

Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives.

Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.

Copper, the 29th element, is a metal. In industry it is praised for its extreme ductility and electrical conductivity which make it an excellent material for wires. Copper is also a nutrient mineral, and is required by the human body to perform certain chemical reactions.

Copper is also important culturally, as one of the first metals to be used by humankind, especially in its alloy form bronze. Even today the pennies in the United States are informally referred to as “coppers.”

The atomic symbol for copper, Cu, comes from the Latin cuprum which also gives its name (via Greek) to Cyprus, an island nation in the Mediterranean renowned for its wealth of copper.

Copper is usually mixed with tin to form bronze, and was a key metal during the Bronze Age.

The Price of Copper and the U.S. Economy

The price of copper has traditionally been one of the very best economic indicator of the future performance of the U.S. economy. Many analysts are concerned.<ref>Barnato, Katy, ”‘Dr. Copper’ Tells Markets the Party’s Over: Albert Edwards“. CNBC, Published May 2, 2013. Accessed February 20, 2015.</ref>. “Copper is viewed by some analysts as a signal of turning points in the world economy, as well as an indicator of whether it is safe to buy cyclical industrial stocks.<ref>Ibid.</ref>

“Copper's downward trend foreshadows a stock market collapse, according to Societe Generale's famously bearish strategist Albert Edwards, who said equity markets will riot 'Japan-style.'” <blockquote>Copper is acting exactly as it did when I wrote about the impotence of liquidity in the face of the (then imminent) 2007 recession. Once again it is giving us an early warning that liquidity will not save risky assets: time to get out of equities.”<ref>Snyder, Michael, ”The Price Of Copper And 11 Other Recession Indicators That Are Flashing Red“. Economic Collapse Blog, Published May 7, 2013. Accessed February 20, 2015.</ref></blockquote>

See Also

References

Specific References
General References

Based on research from diverse Fair Use Disclaimer Sources:

Snippet from Wikipedia: Copper

Copper is a chemical element with the symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a pinkish-orange color. Copper is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement.

Copper is one of the few metals that can occur in nature in a directly usable metallic form (native metals). This led to very early human use in several regions, from c. 8000 BC. Thousands of years later, it was the first metal to be smelted from sulfide ores, c. 5000 BC; the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c. 4000 BC; and the first metal to be purposefully alloyed with another metal, tin, to create bronze, c. 3500 BC.

In the Roman era, copper was mined principally on Cyprus, the origin of the name of the metal, from aes сyprium (metal of Cyprus), later corrupted to сuprum (Latin). Coper (Old English) and copper were derived from this, the later spelling first used around 1530.

Commonly encountered compounds are copper(II) salts, which often impart blue or green colors to such minerals as azurite, malachite, and turquoise, and have been used widely and historically as pigments.

Copper used in buildings, usually for roofing, oxidizes to form a green verdigris (or patina). Copper is sometimes used in decorative art, both in its elemental metal form and in compounds as pigments. Copper compounds are used as bacteriostatic agents, fungicides, and wood preservatives.

Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome c oxidase. In molluscs and crustaceans, copper is a constituent of the blood pigment hemocyanin, replaced by the iron-complexed hemoglobin in fish and other vertebrates. In humans, copper is found mainly in the liver, muscle, and bone. The adult body contains between 1.4 and 2.1 mg of copper per kilogram of body weight.

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copper.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/12 18:33 (external edit)