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Snippet from Wikipedia: Bitterroot Mountains

The Northern and Central Bitterroot Range, collectively the Bitterroot Mountains (Salish: čkʷlkʷqin ), is the largest portion of the Bitterroot Range, part of the Rocky Mountains, located in the panhandle of Idaho and westernmost Montana in the Western United States. The mountains encompass an area of 4,862 square miles (12,593 km²).

The mountains are bordered on the north by Lolo Creek, to the northeast by the Clark Fork, on the south by the Salmon River, on the east by the Bitterroot River and Valley, and on the west by the Selway and Lochsa Rivers. Its highest summit is Trapper Peak, at 10,157 feet (3,096 m).

The Northern and Central Bitterroot Range, collectively the Bitterroot Mountains (Salish: čkʷlkʷqin <ref>

</ref>) , is the largest portion of the Bitterroot Range, part of the Rocky Mountains, located in the panhandle of Idaho and westernmost Montana in the Western United States. The mountains encompass an area of 4,862&nbsp;square miles&nbsp;(12,593&nbsp;km²).

The mountains are bordered on the north by Lolo Creek, to the northeast by the Clark Fork, on the south by the Salmon River, on the east by the Bitterroot River and Valley, and on the west by the Selway and Lochsa Rivers.<ref>"Bitterroot Mountains". Canadian Mountain Encyclopedia. Bivouac.com. Retrieved 4 March 2007.</ref> Its highest summit is Trapper Peak, at

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Northern Bitterroot Range

The Northern Bitterroot Range is the northernmost and shortest subrange of the Bitterroot Mountains. The Northern Bitterroots encompass 1,869&nbsp;square miles&nbsp;(4,841&nbsp;km²) and its two tallest peaks are the 7,930&nbsp;foot&nbsp;(2,417&nbsp;m) Rhodes Peak and the 7,770&nbsp;foot&nbsp;(2,368&nbsp;m) Quartz Benchmark.<ref>

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The Northern Bitterroots also contain a smaller subrange, the Grave Creek Range. The Grave Creek Range is 262&nbsp;square miles&nbsp;(679&nbsp;km²) in area and its highest peak is the 7,270&nbsp;foot&nbsp;(2,216&nbsp;m) Petty Mountain.<ref>

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Central Bitterroot Range

The Central Bitterroot Range is the southernmost and tallest subrange of the Bitterroot Mountains. The Central Bitterroots encompass 2,993&nbsp;square miles&nbsp;(7,752&nbsp;km²) and its two tallest peaks are the 10,157&nbsp;foot&nbsp;(3,096&nbsp;m) Trapper Peak and the 9,983&nbsp;foot&nbsp;(3,043&nbsp;m) El Capitan.<ref>

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The Central Bitterroots also contain a smaller subrange, the Como Peaks. The Como Peaks subrange is 79&nbsp;square miles&nbsp;(205&nbsp;km²) in area and its highest peak is the aforementioned El Capitan.

Bitterroot controversy

Swanson (2011) examines the critical role of Guy M. Brandborg of the U.S. Forest Service, who was supervisor of the Bitterroot National Forest from 1935 to 1955. By insisting on selection cutting, he tried to protect the watersheds and wildlife habitats that are harmed by clear-cutting. After he retired in 1955 Brandborg denounced the Forest Service for deviating from his model. He launched a public attack, known as the “Bitterroot controversy.” Brandborg lobbied to secure passage of the National Forest Management Act of 1976, that codified his model.

See also

Further reading

  • Swanson, Frederick H. The Bitterroot and Mr. Brandborg: Clearcutting and the Struggle for Sustainable Forestry in the Northern Rockies (University of Utah Press, 2011). ISBN 978-1-60781-101-5

Notes

bitterroot_mountains.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/12 18:32 (external edit)